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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

A reunion of one of the most creative groups in jazz (although Paul Bley, Gary Peacock and Paul Motian have played together in diverse pairings over the decades, this is the 1st time they've recorded as a trio in 35 years!). The music is powerful, hypnotic and timeless. Highlights include Bley's depth-sounding explorations at the bottom end of the Bosendorfer piano, a reworking of Fig Foot from the trio's '60's repertoire and a stunning Peacock solo on "Entelechy."

Amazon.com

In the early '60s, pianist Paul Bley's trios did much to expand the role of bass and drums, developing a conversational intimacy at the intersection of bop, modal, and free jazz. One of the best of those groups consisted of bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Paul Motian (Bill Evans's rhythm section in the same period), but their only recording as a trio was part of Paul Bley with Gary Peacock from 1963. While the two have worked extensively with Bley in different settings through the years, this 1998 meeting was the first time they had recorded as a trio in 35 years. They touch on the previous session with Bley's "Fig Foot," a taut rethinking of the blues, but this is much more than a reunion. Each of these musicians is a virtuoso of space and the telling gesture, an inspired inventor possessed of an edgy creativity and willing to lead this sometimes pensive, sometimes rapturous music into new directions. Along with the sheer sonic beauty, there's probing, too, as in the alternately tense and playful, overlapping dialogue of "Set Up Set." Bley's gift for spontaneous melody is frequently apparent, while Peacock's unaccompanied "Entelechy" highlights an expressive depth of which few bassists are capable. --Stuart Broomer

Not Two Not One